SKINSENSE

How to keep your skin radiant and younger for longer



An average adult's skin weighs about four kilograms and has a surface area of around 6 square metres, making the skin the body's largest organ. As such, it has quite a few responsibilities, including eliminating carbon dioxide and other forms of waste, acting as a shield against environmental toxins, and regulating body temperature. Our skin is always at work, continually repairing and renewing itself.


Although the skin has many layers, it can be divided into three main sections. The outer protective portion, the epidermis, contain skin cells, pigment and proteins. These skin cells are constantly being shed and replaced by the ones underneath. A skin cell takes three to four weeks from its formation to reach the surface. Beneath the epidermis lies the dermis, the skin's support system, containing water, blood vessels, nerves, hair follicles, sweat glands and oil, or sebaceous glands. Both the sweat and sebaceous glands help produce the skin's acid mantel, a thin coating of oil and


What's good for the body is great for the skin!

When we age, biochemical changes occur in collagen and elastin of the skin, the protein fibres that give skin its youthful tone and appearance. Aged skin also appears more translucent because of the decrease in the number of pigment-containing cells called melanocytes. As the subcutaneous fat layer begins to lose its padding and connective tissue support, the skin begins to sag and look less supple, and wrinkles form. And because aged skin is thinner and more fragile, it is at increased risk of injury. UVA damage leads to the breakdown of the skin's collagen fibres, which keeps the skin firm and sag-free. Excessive damage, which may not show up for years, is often revealed in a leathery look of the skin, and also in the form of skin cancer and age spots.


" One of the major problems of advanced aging is the sagging of tissues caused by the destruction of the skin's underlying support structure "







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